Solitude

Whitefish, Montana City Lake
Whitefish, Montana City Lake

Ode on Solitude

By Alexander Pope

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread,

Whose flocks supply him with attire,
Whose trees in summer yield him shade,
In winter fire.

Blest, who can unconcernedly find
Hours, days, and years slide soft away,
In health of body, peace of mind,
Quiet by day,

Sound sleep by night; study and ease,
Together mixed; sweet recreation;
And innocence, most does please,
With meditation.

Let me live, unseen, unknown;
Unlamented let me die;
Alone

And not a stone
Tell where I lie.

3800-milky-way

In the middle of a billion stars

Happy the woman
Who dreams and dares

Unseen, unknown, and quite alone
In the middle of a billion stars

Who finds a bit of piece of mind
Quoting verse
In her corner of the universe
All the while

In peaceful meditation
Chanting sweet incantations
In a Stressless chair

 

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Success

It is said that to succeed one has to get up before the others, before the birds, before the sun, drink a cup of coffee, eat a piece of toast and an egg, put on your shoes and run, run just to keep in the same place, and run faster if you want to succeed.

Oh, but the trees, the mountains, and the lakes know better. They are always there watching me, wordlessly, knowing that there is a joy in sitting back and watching silently. Lessons are learned by listening, not just with the ears, but the eyes.

Life is meant to be enjoyed, Stresslessly.

kintla_lake_cowboy

What a beautiful place to be, I thought, gazing around Kintla Lake. Calm, peaceful, serene, about as far north in Montana one could go without going over the border into Canada.

“Be mindful of the bears,” the park ranger said.

“Oh, I know,” I replied, “I come from a place full of them.”

 

Castaway

Shipwrecked on a desert isle

There is much wisdom books, but wisdom, by this I mean true wisdom, wisdom which we apply and use, is not found it is learned.

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

[Shipwrecked on a desert isle]

SEPTEMBER 30, 1659. – I, poor miserable Robinson Crusoe, being shipwrecked during a dreadful storm in the offing, came on shore on this dismal, unfortunate island, which I called “The Island of Despair”; all the rest of the ship’s company being drowned, and myself almost dead.

Castaway on a dessert isle with a Stressless recliner
Castaway on a desert isle with a Stressless recliner

[By the end of the second year]

From this moment I began to conclude in my mind that it was possible for me to be more happy in this forsaken, solitary condition than it was probable I should ever have been in any other particular state in the world; and with this thought I was going to give thanks to God for bringing me to this place…

[In the fifth year wherein he makes a great discovery]

In the first place, I was removed from all the wickedness of the world here. I had neither the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eye, or the pride of life. I had nothing to covet, for I had all that I was now capable of enjoying. I was lord of the whole manor; or if I pleased, I might call myself king or emperor over the whole country which I had possession of. There were no rivals: I had no competitor, none to dispute sovereignty or command with me. I might have raised shiploadings of corn, but I had no use of it; so I let as little grow as I thought enough for my occasion. I had tortoise or turtles enough, but now and then one was as much as I could put to any use. I had timber enough to have built a fleet of ships. I had grapes enough to have made wine, or to have cured into raisins, to have loaded that fleet when they had been built.

[Finding a footprint in the sand]

How strange a chequer-work of Providence is the life of man! and by what secret different springs are the affections hurried about, as different circumstances present! To-day we love what to-morrow we hate; to-day we seek what to-morrow we shun; to-day we desire what to-morrow we fear, nay, even tremble at the apprehensions of. This was exemplified in me, at this time, in the most lively manner imaginable; for I, whose only affliction was that I seemed banished from human society, that I was alone, circumscribed by the boundless ocean, cut off from mankind, and condemned to what I call silent life; that I was as one whom Heaven thought not worthy to be numbered among the living, or to appear among the rest of His creatures; that to have seen one of my own species would have seemed to me a raising me from death to life, and the greatest blessing that Heaven itself, next to the supreme blessing of salvation, could bestow; I say, that I should now tremble at the very apprehensions of seeing a man, and was ready to sink into the ground at but the shadow or silent appearance of a man having set his foot in the island.

[His return to England]

When I took leave of this island, I carried on board, for relics, the great goat-skin cap I had made, my umbrella, and one of my parrots; also, I forgot not to take the money I formerly mentioned, which had lain by me so long useless that it was grown rusty or tarnished, and could hardly pass for silver till it had been a little rubbed and handled, as also the money I found in the wreck of the Spanish ship. And thus I left the island, the 19th of December, as I found by the ship’s account, in the year 1686, after I had been upon it eight-and-twenty years, two months, and nineteen days; being delivered from this second captivity the same day of the month that I first made my escape in the long-boat from among the Moors of Sallee. In this vessel, after a long voyage, I arrived in England the 11th of June, in the year 1687, having been thirty-five years absent.

Read Robinson Crusoe online

Thoughts of Home

“Home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”

Most people think the line is a joke, but Robert Frost meant it seriously as a line in his poem Death of the Hired Man. The poem takes place on a Vermont farm. Mary, the farmer’s wife, sits at the kitchen table musing on the lamp-flame, waiting for her husband Warren to tell him the news, “Silas is back.”

And discuss what to do?

Robert Frost is always worth reading. Always familiar, like an old shoe that fits comfortably each time you put it on. Always stirring a few thoughts, some original some not.

reno-chair

It is true, women want what they can’t have – a home in the country, a three-car garage, 2.2 children, and a husband who takes out the garbage.

Home, I can’t define it but I know it when I see it.

Once you grow up and leave home, you learn the world is big and wide, and finding your way home is no easy thing.

The best part of traveling is losing yourself and then finding yourself.

Not all who wander are lost.

Home is not so much a place as a state of mind.

You can’t go home again, but you can visit.

Goreme Turkey
Goreme Turkey

You don’t need to know where you are going or where you are to be where you need to be.

There are challenges in life and crossroads, and when I come to them I have always followed Yogi Berra’s advice, when you see a fork in the road, take it.

There are two directions in life, home and away from home.

I am not from West Virginia, but every time I hear John Denver sing his song Country Roads, I want to be.

A chair is to most of us, home for most of the time, so why not make it Stressless.

Stressless around the world
Stressless around the world

Notes.

I have traveled a bit in my lifetime and I have never been so fond of home as when I am away from it.

Göreme, Turkey is home to 2,000 souls. It is a town that is famous for its rock formations in ancient Cappadocia, central Turkey and part of Anatolia. Settlements in Göreme go back 3,000 years to the era of the Hittites. During the conflict between the Persians and the Greeks, the inhabitants tunneled into the rock to escape the fighting.

It appears that there are not regular streets or addresses so how in the world does the postman deliver a letter? The image is from Pixabay.

Stress-less

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Stress less – the opposite of stress, having no worry, anxiety, trouble, or difficulty; this deer has no fear of man, and therefore has achieved a state of being stressless.

How to reduce stress:

1. Meditate, think happy thoughts.
2. Breathe Deeply. Take a 5-minute break outside and breathe the fresh air.
3. Be Present, life is made of moments, don’t miss it.
4. Reach Out, connect with the mysteries of the universe.
5. Buy a Stressless recliner, it really is the world’s ultimate chair.

deer_face
Yes, I am looking at you.

Slinningsbålet

If you are just reading this, then you already missed it.

In Norway, people celebrate the coming of summer with a celebration called Slinningsbålet. The celebration marks the time when the days grow short and the sun begins to retreat in the sky and in Norway they celebrate with the world’s largest bonfire. Norway’s largest celebration takes place on June the 24th in Ålesund in the county of Møre og Romsdal, on the western coastline of Norway. In 2010, the townsfolk built a massive tower of shipping crates, a record-setting 132.71 feet tall.

Though you missed it, you can connect via Facebook and relive the 2017 celebration.

Or, if you prefer Twitter.

Did I mention that Stressless recliners and office chairs are designed and made in Ikornnes, a village along the Sykkylvsfjorden, in Møre og Romsdal county. Though you missed this year’s Slinningsbålet, you can still relax in your favorite Stressless recliner and enjoy the summer weather.

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Stressless recliners are carried by many fine retailers including:

Homefurnishers where you can safely and securely shop online.

After the rain

Thy fate is the common fate of all, into each life some rain must fall.
Henry Wordsworth Longfellow

For life, it is very, very bad to be sensitive, for a writer it is very good.
Karl Ove Knausgård

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Møre og Romsdal

Where in the world is Møre og Romsdal?

The answer, perhaps, I say, is not where but what. It is not so much a place, but a state of mind, a place of peace and tranquility, watered by rain, nourished by sun, far, far away from the troubles of urban life.

South of Trondheim, north of Bergen, in the northern part of Western Norway lies the county of Møre og Romsdal. The Old Norse form of the name was Raumsdalr, after the Rauma River and valley it forms (Raums plus dalr or dair, dale meaning valley). Møre og Romsdal consists of three regions: Nordmøre, Romsdal and Sunnmøre.

Geographically, the county consists of many islands, towering mountains, waterfalls, and deep fjords of clear blue water, including the stunning Sykkylvsfjorden (where Stressless recliners are made), a branch off the equally beautiful 68-mile-long Storfjorden in Sunnmøre.

The name Møre is from Old Norse: Mœrr, from the word marr, meaning “sea” (akin to the Latin word mare). Several distinct dialects are spoken, no doubt due to the existence of so many islands and deep fjords.

As its coat of arms, the county chose the symbol of three Viking ships in yellow on a pale blue background (the masts and the yards create three crosses), a reference to the Viking fore-bearers of today’s Norwegians, who during the late 8th to late 11th centuries sailed their long boats across the European continent, raiding and pillaging.

Because of its location on the Norwegian Sea, the weather is often cloudy and raining. That is very, very bad for nature lovers, but very good for writers like Karl Ove Knausgård.

Check out, Some Rain Must Fall, Book 5 in his series My Struggle.

But the rain does not fall forever; and after the rain, the skies are clear and the air is fresh, the birds sing, the fish swim, and the Norwegians go outdoors and enjoy life, and so do I.

Stressless recliners

sunsetsHappy_2(Raums)